Sunday, June 26, 2011

Don't Trifle with me

Trifle (TRI-fuhl) - The word "trifle" comes from the old French term "trufle," and literally means something whimsical or of little consequence. A proper English trifle is made with real egg custard poured over sponge cake soaked in fruit and sherry and topped with whipped cream.


It was in the mid-1700s England that cake (or biscuits), alcohol, and custard were combined in the trifle bowl. The recipe for trifle (and many of its now-heirloom glass dishes) came to America via the British who settled in the coastal South. Its popularity remained firm with Southern planters who loved indulgent desserts. Supposedly, it was called Tipsy Parson because it presumably lured many a Sunday-visiting preacher off the wagon. Southern hostesses prided themselves on their elegant table settings and considered a cut-glass trifle bowl to be mandatory.



I was in the mood for something sweet, something chocolate and creamy and maybe chewy. Well, hm put that all together, sweet creamy chewy, you get a trifle.

Anyway I just found a recipe in chocolate. Oh, my favorite.





Ingredients





1 (19.8 ounce) package brownie mix

1 (3.9 ounce) package instant chocolate pudding mix

1/2 cup water

1 (14 ounce) can sweetened condensed milk

1 (8 ounce) container frozen whipped topping, thawed

1 (12 ounce) container frozen whipped topping, thawed

1 (1.5 ounce) bar chocolate candy



Directions



1. Prepare brownie mix according to package directions and cool completely. Cut into 1 inch squares.



2. In a large bowl, combine pudding mix, water and sweetened condensed milk. Mix until smooth, then fold in 8 ounces whipped topping until no streaks remain.



3. In a trifle bowl or glass serving dish, place half of the brownies, half of the pudding mixture and half of the 12 ounce container of whipped topping. Repeat layers. Shave chocolate onto top layer for garnish.



Refrigerate 8 hours before serving.



I want to thank Cooking America for the history and allrecipes.com for the recipe